September 19, 2014
alexbaca:

❤️

<3 <3 <3

alexbaca:

❤️

<3 <3 <3

September 19, 2014

(Source: annfriedman)

September 19, 2014

(Source: kingofthehillcaps, via fivefifteen)

September 19, 2014

(Source: , via brandonbird)

September 18, 2014
omgthatdress:

Sweater
Elsa Schiaparelli, 1928
The Philadelphia Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Sweater

Elsa Schiaparelli, 1928

The Philadelphia Museum of Art

September 8, 2014
Just hanging out at Mary Tyler moore&#8217;s house, nbd

Just hanging out at Mary Tyler moore’s house, nbd

August 31, 2014
there were many great moments at this year&#8217;s decatur book festival, but amelia got a shot of one of the best: &#8220;Patricia Lockwood and the gentleman who could not be kept from his Saturday laps at the DBF.&#8221;

there were many great moments at this year’s decatur book festival, but amelia got a shot of one of the best: “Patricia Lockwood and the gentleman who could not be kept from his Saturday laps at the DBF.”

August 30, 2014
"There are years that ask questions and years that answer."

— Zora Neale Hurston (via observando)

(via thetinhouse)

August 28, 2014
Coworker made a cheese portrait of me for my birthday and I am too bowled over and amazed to come up with a cheese pun to describe my delight.

Coworker made a cheese portrait of me for my birthday and I am too bowled over and amazed to come up with a cheese pun to describe my delight.

August 27, 2014
"

In Engerman and Sokoloff’s narrative, slavery led to inequality, which led to economic underdevelopment. But when Nunn examined levels of inequality in 1860—as measured by holdings of land—these proved a poor predictor of future problems. Only the presence of slavery was a harbinger of problems. “It is not economic inequality that caused the subsequent development of poor institutions,” wrote Nunn. “Rather, it was slavery itself.”


In lands turned over to slavery, Wright had observed, there was little incentive to provide so-called public goods—schools, libraries, and other institutions—that attract migrants. In the North, by contrast, the need to attract and retain free labor in areas resulted in a far greater investment in public goods—institutions that would, over the succeeding decades, offer far greater opportunities for social mobility and lay the foundation for sustained, superior economic growth.

"

Where slavery thrived, inequality rules today

But there is room for hope, as Wright’s own research would suggest. In “Sharing the Prize,” an economic history of the civil rights movement published in 2013, Wright found that efforts to end discrimination paid substantial, enduring benefits to black Southerners. Perhaps more surprisingly, he found that the movement benefited whites, too. Many poorer whites found that that the destruction of the old order—the end of poll taxes, for example—ushered in increased levels of public funding for schools, newfound political power, and a host of other economic, political, and educational benefits, particularly in the years immediately following the passage of the Civil Rights Act.